Goals of the Project

Overall objective:  To propose a thematic approach to freshman year composition that employs ecological rhetoric for a multimodal and multidisciplinary approach to writing and reading assignments, classroom activities, and academic discourse.

Affective course goals:

1. To inspire biophilia as well as a love for learning while engaging academic  discouse in a project that speaks to the current ecological crisis or environmental issues of academic life and/or the global human habitat.

2.  Facilitate,  mediate, and remediate through semiotics  with  meaningful academic and social discourse to develop empathy for both human and non-human needs in the struggle for existence.  To develop empathy, sympathy, as well as affirmation of personal goals for resolving conflicts between freedom and responsibility as mirrored in local and global ecosystems.

3. To discover and engage in a sustained effort toward a final product that results in a planned academic/social event or electronic portfolio or website housing students’ compostions.

4.  To discover and engage the creative link that connects invention in science and inspiration in the humanities through literate and literary discourse and action.

Cognitive:

1.  Develop skills, lexicons, and applications that resonate in two our more major academic areas of interest.

2.  To practice prewriting, post-process revision,  peer-review editing, and to master tasks associated with publishing in a multimodal venue.  Or, to propose an organic form of multimodal presentation for a final product, such as a stage production, a panel discussion, a recorded interview, a sound-recording for the visually impaired, or a consciousness-raising planned event.

3.  Synthesize specialized and technical vocabularies from at least two academic subjects and use visual and audio enhancements or designs to demonstrate mastery over the rhetoric of inquiry and persuasive argument.  Or, to employ an organic approach by employing reader’s theatre or orginal arts and crafts to demonstrate mastery of an ecological conflict and argument for resolution.

4.  To share ideas and conclusions in a permanent portfolio linked to a planned event, a podcast, a multimodal website, or other written project that links composition and writing to environmental issues; to share electronic portfolio or reflection essay on project with class or other social forum.  To produce evidence of impact, or write prediction of future impact based on experiences in classroom activities and assignments.